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Mar 27, 2024

Wildlife Report

As spring approaches but before the trees grow leaves is a perfect time to spot the bird that is singing. The treecreeper has a high-pitched song which is difficult to hear and is notoriously difficult to see as well, being camouflaged against the bark they search for invertebrates.

 

 

The lichens growing on the tree trunks and branches are also worth inspection. The colour and structure of each lichen is dependent on the species of fungus and algae or cyanobacterium that come together in partnership to form them.

 

 

Another curious growth that piques the interest of visitors at this time of year is the Witches’ Broom found in the birch trees. First impressions suggest masses of nests or clumps of mistletoe but in fact they are galls, caused by infection of the buds with the fungus Taphrina betulina which is specific for birch trees. Although a parasite, they don’t cause any harm to the tree.

 

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